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Copyright Robert Cole 2015 - No copying or distributing

THE MECHANICS OF APPRAISAL

While appraisal, as a process, is done for historical query, it is also necessary when fixing value.

Valuation of both Japanese swords and fittings is accorded through an historically derived market, of long standing, directed to the works or fame of gifted individuals or schools.

As it is the makers of articles that signify market potential, the job of appraisal comes to confident identification of origin.

The Process

When appraising an individual piece, the sword blade is considered last. First in appraisal is placing value to whatever articles attend the blade, namely, KOSHIRAE or sword fittings - the "furniture".

Fittings have a value separate from that of sword blades. They are figured piece by piece and summed later with the value of the blade to complete an appraisal.

While the purview of this book is appraisal of sword blades, not the valuation of KOSHIRAE, a subject of its own, the operation plays a definite part in appraisal procedure, - the first part.

A spot appraisal is conducted quickly: as with all operations involving a sword that is viewed for the first time, Japanese propriety asks that a small moment be devoted to reverence of the piece and the KAMI. This might be a slight bowing or a nod of the head. This applies, of course, where propriety applies.

One checks the fittings in order:

The sword is then unshiethed and examined in the fashion described in the Appraisal of Blades section following the notes on KOSHIRAE.

Swords are examined first for:

Estimates are summed and added with condition. The most important aspect to keep clearly in focus is the value-dictates of condition. To the degree that condition is wanting, the potential market price must suffer substantially, falling to less than a third. The sections on price and buying & selling are meant to impart the reality of the market. The Japanese sword market, in Japan, and the world sword market are the functioning engine of values that create money for swords. Without a broad based market, antiques are simple curios. Sword values are established by lists of sword makers derived from sales based on the interest given artistic work, history and historical considerations, or even the mere traditionally popular.

Show-room condition, what is known as MEIBUTSU, is a condition which allows a fully developed market potential. Swords and fiitings must be in top condition or restorable to top condition to compete in the market. If a piece is not restorable it sits outside market, losing all claim to market and listing. It is then but a curio, perhaps a fine curio, but is comparatively, worthless.
 



 


 Sho-shin
- NENGO Chrono
- NENGO Alpha
 Juyo Cookbook
Glossary
Titles
Personal Titles
Sovereigns