Copyright Robert Cole 2014 - No copying or distributing - Note: Missing graphics

Grain Pattern

The actual HADA pattern can be combinations of the following:

MASAME -
KO-MASAME -
O-MASAME -
Straight-like grain pattern
Small straight pattern
Large straight pattern
ITAME -
KO-ITAME -
O-ITAME -
Wood "grain like a board"
Small wood pattern
Large wood pattern
MOKUME -
KO-MOKUME -
O-MOKUME -
Burl-like grain pattern
Small burl pattern
Large burl pattern
AYASUGI - Flowing Cedar. Large undulating wave grain pattern
NASHIJI - Flesh of a Pear pattern Condition of very finely worked HADA
MUJI - No grain
///////ARTWORK////// All grain patterns//

The terms may be seen used short, MASA, ITA, MOKU as, "O-ITA KO-MOKU mix." This is generally improper, however.

O-HADA is a large grain pattern or an individually large area of grain. These might be called UZU, swirling cloud or whirlpool.

////Missing graphic - ARTWORK////

      YAUBASHIRI / UZU-MAKI, etc

YUBASHIRI is a term used to describe the swirling condition of a certain form of running HADA. The term YUBASHIRI means "running water" and is also used for swirling or wisp-like features of the hardened edge pattern, or YAKIBA.

When a grain pattern appears drawn-out it may be labeled, "running," "flowing," or "streaming."

Sword descriptions may note HADA as being "pronounced" or "standing out."

NOTE: Some publications use "ITAME" to denote the presence of patterned grain or to describe any grain pattern other than straight-grain, MASAME, or no grain, MU-JI. Occasionally, one finds auction or museum pamphlets confusing "ITAME" for patina, a misunderstanding. Grain pattern may actually be MOKUME or combinations.
Sho-shin
Glossary